Classic Shell

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Free Utilities 

Classic Shell is a collection of features that were available in older versions of Windows but are removed from Vista and Windows 7. It has a classic start menu for Windows 7. It adds a toolbar for Windows Explorer and supports a variety of smaller features. Classic Shell adds some missing features to Windows 7 and Vista like a classic start menu, toolbar for Explorer and others.

What’s new in this version: Version 3.6.6 has added new setting to disable the taskbar transparency and fixed some bugs found in the previous version.

License: Free

Limitations: No limitations

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JuniorWatch

February 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Free Utilities 

As a parent, you’re responsible for what your children see and do online, and parental control suites like JuniorWatch can help out. This free application monitors, logs, and reports all activity on your family PC or your child’s PC. JuniorWatch captures screenshots and Webcam shots, logs keystrokes, monitors the clipboard, saves browser history, and blocks inappropriate Web sites. You can also delete and retrieve files remotely with JuniorWatch. In addition to overall upgrades, new features include anti-phishing and porn blocker tools.

Before you install JuniorWatch, we recommend first signing up for a free account at the program’s Web site. This entails creating a user name and password and providing some personal information, including name, e-mail address, and time zone. You’ll need your user name and password to install JuniorWatch. Registered devices like our PC show up in JuniorWatch’s Web-based My Devices management tool. It’s ad-supported, but that’s how JuniorWatch stays free, and a few Web ads are probably not high on the typical parent’s list of Major Annoyances.

The Web-based log showed our target PC’s name, operating system, and the time of the latest report. But under Location it showed the address of our ISP’s servers. We could display the location on a Google map. The Web-based settings let you manage your Accounts and Devices anywhere you can log on. Speaking of Devices, JuniorWatch also offers an Android option. We didn’t test it, but that’s the sort of extra that can make a big difference to some parents, especially those who are still ahead of their own kids in tech ability (for now).

While JuniorWatch is free for all users, it’s also available in Professional and Enterprise editions for users with special needs, such as hosting the program on their own servers. JuniorWatch proved effective at monitoring and logging our target PC’s activity. For parents, that means being able to see exactly what the kids are up to when they go online.

 

 

 

 

 

JuniorWatch you may have the peace of mind. You will sure your kids are safe. After you sign up the service, and install the client software on your juniors computer, the client software will consistently report locations, screen and webcam shots, and even key strokes from the computer. You can access the reports from any computer. With all the information you will be able to know what your kids is doing and thinking. If something is not right, you will be able to prevent it from getting worse.
Tracking computer location
Monitor screen captures
Monitor webcam shots
Monitor Key boards
Monitor Clipboard
Monitor Browser history
Block inappropriate sites
Retrive files remotely
Delete files remotely
Run in the background
What’s new in this version:
Version 3.1.0.2989: Tracking computer location
Monitor screen captures
Monitor webcam shots
Monitor Key boards
Monitor Clipboard
Monitor Browser history
Block inappropriate sites
Retrive files remotely
Delete files remotely
Run in the background
Porn blocker
Anti-phishing

License: Free

Limitations: No limitations

Download Now

 

WirelessKeyView (64-bit)

January 22, 2013 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Free Utilities 

WirelessKeyView (64-bit) recovers all wireless network security keys/passwords (WEP/WPA) stored in your computer by the ‘Wireless Zero Configuration’ service of Windows XP and by the ‘WLAN AutoConfig’ service of Windows Vista. It allows you to easily save all keys to text/html/xml file, or copy a single key to the clipboard.

 

 

 

 

What’s new in this version: Version 1.60 uses a new method to grab the wireless keys on Windows 7/8/2008

License: Free

Limitations: No limitations

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SmartDeblur

November 2, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Free Utilities 

SmartDeblur is a tool for restoration of defocused and blurred images.SmartDeblur uses the FFTW library which provides fast fourier tranformation implementation. It features high speed processing of an image with the size of 2048*1500 pixels takes about 300ms in the Preview mode, real-time parameters changes applying, full resolution processing, deep tuning of kernel parameters, easy and friendly user interface, help screen with image example, and deconvolution methods: Wiener, Tikhonov, and Total Variation prior.

License: Free

Limitations: No limitations

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Advanced SystemCare Free

March 29, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Free Utilities, Tweaks 

Advanced SystemCare Free 5 uses its powerful arsenal of optimization tools to keep your PC feeling fresh and clean. It also includes a couple of features that could help boost performance for either gaming or work purposes–your choice.

Advanced SystemCare’s Quick Care option includes the ability to clean your registry, perform a rudimentary malware scan, fix and remove broken shortcuts, delete junk files, and erase browsing tracks. It works in a flash, requires almost no user input, and to make things even easier, can be configured to run on system startup.

The Deep Care option, on the other hand, takes system care to another level. It performs all of the Quick Care items to a much deeper degree, plus it adds several other scans and fixes to its checklist, including disk defragmenting, a Windows vulnerability fix, and a system optimization with several presets. Understandably, this kind of deep digging can sometimes make a user nervous. Fortunately, the program’s log records all of its activities, letting you see how each affects your computer.

Scan times for the Quick Care and Deep Care options differ significantly, yet, both processes still seem blazingly fast. For instance, we completed a Deep Care scan in approximately 15 minutes, which is an impressively short time for a system-invasive program like this.

Brand-new to version 5 is the Active Boost function, which runs in the background and automatically improves PC performance by managing your system resources. We recommend enabling it, as it even keeps a log of all the active processes that it manages to speed up. Also important, Version 5 connects to the cloud in order to keep its database up to date.

As for Advanced SystemCare’s user interface, we were impressed, to say the least. The main dashboard is superclean, with nifty icons and intuitive navigation. Plus, there’s an unimposing smiley face always at the bottom of the screen, indicating your PC’s overall health. If you click the Status button next to the smiley, you can also get more detailed info from the system performance monitor.

One part of the program we recommend new users approach with extreme caution is the Turbo Boost, which can be set to optimize for either gaming or work purposes. It sounds fun, but you must first configure the tool by telling it which core system services to disable in order to accelerate your computer’s performance. Since the Turbo Boost section doesn’t spell out how disabling these services might affect your computer, we highly recommend doing your research before exploring. To its credit, though, Advanced SystemCare can create rescue points, so it’s not hard to undo changes if you end up making any mistakes.

One small problem we found was that some of the program’s options open in new windows, while others open in the same window. Those in the same window have convenient back-navigation buttons in the upper left; those in new windows are sometimes overlaid directly on top of the previous window and make it hard to see how to return to the previous screen. Also, we were a bit turned off by the cleverly disguised ad for Roboform Password Manager during installation. It looks a bit like a terms-of-service sheet, so be sure to read carefully before your instincts kick in and you automatically click Accept.

Overall, we love Advanced SystemCare’s toolset, performance, and convenience. Sure, we wish the program were more explicit about how it changes your computer, but we still think it’s an awesome all-in-one system utility, and we highly recommend downloading it.

License: Free

Limitations: No limitations

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Lookout Mobile Security for Android

January 27, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Mobile Apps 

Antivirus prevention isn’t anywhere near as necessary for Android devices as it is for Windows computers just yet. As Android’s market share grows, though, so will the attacks. More importantly for the here and now, Lookout Mobile Security provides key security options that are unique to the mobile market. Along with the antivirus and anti-malware tech, there’s a lost and stolen phone locator service, an application privacy adviser, and a backup service.
Installation

<a href=”http://myinternetspeed.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Lookout_main.png” target=”_blank”><img class=”alignleft size-medium wp-image-787″ title=”Lookout_main” src=”http://myinternetspeed.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Lookout_main-168×300.png” alt=”” width=”168″ height=”300″ /></a>
Lookout’s installation is smooth and simple. The free account registration requires a valid e-mail address, which is important because several of the app’s features require communication with the user.
As a security app, it’s not surprising that Lookout will grab with some fairly deep hooks into your Android device. Lookout has permission rights to your personal information, messages, location, network communication, accounts, storage, phone calls, hardware controls, and system tools.
Interface
Lookout’s interface is helpfully simple to navigate. At the top right of the app, a status notification tells you if you’ve got security problems or if, “Everything is OK.” Below that, the four main features are presented as buttons. Tap one to reveal a button that will run the feature, if it’s the Security scan, the Privacy scan, or the Backup.
The Missing Phone option is less intuitive. It merely tells you to go to myLookout.com to locate, lock, scream, or wipe your phone. The scream option sets off a high-pitched alarm to annoy phone thieves and alert others. Of course, you’re not going to require any of those options if you know where your phone is. But it’s a good reminder that the feature is there, even if it’s only for Web use.
You can access Lookout from the app or a notification bar icon that also informs you of your status. The Settings hardware button reveals a reasonable although not robust selection of options to configure, presented in the standard and familiar Android style.

Features and support
Lookout’s features are robust and comprehensive, at least for what’s known about the still-developing field of mobile security.
It’s difficult at the moment to verify whether the antivirus and anti-malware feature actually does anything, since there are few if any labs that test mobile antivirus and anti-malware apps. At this point, we know it’s there, and we know that Lookout says it does proactive things to keep you from getting infected. Those infections are not something you’re likely to come across, so we’ll just acknowledge the feature and file it under “incomplete.”
Lookout has provided reviewers with access to a demo malicious app, which gets blocked by Lookout when you attempt to install it. Though the app worked in that instance, that kind of test is hardly verifiable. However, Android-based threats do exists and as they occur with more frequency, it’s highly likely that standards for testing security apps will emerge.
The other security features in the app are quite effective. Most notable among them is the phone tracker, which uses your GPS to track your phone’s location. Again, if it’s been lost or stolen, you can log in to MyLookout.com to find your phone. From its online interface, you can also set off the screaming alarm designed to annoy your phone’s thief enough to abandon it, as well as remotely wipe or lock the phone.
The MyLookout site is also where you can initiate a backup and restore, run a security scan, and toggle settings, although those features can be run directly from the phone. The site contains logs of its activity that you can browse to keep tabs on the app’s behavior. The logs are quite detailed: for example, the app scan log will tell you how many apps were searched.

Once you begin a scan, you can continue to move about the app.
The Backup feature covers your contacts, photos, and your call log, and is encrypted for security during transfer. Restoring allows a full restoration of all backed-up data as well as granular control over which specific calls, photos, and contacts are restored.
The Privacy adviser rounds up all the permissions from your apps and lets you know which apps have access to the different parts of your phone. This is an excellent, simple tool for checking out what your apps are doing, because, let’s face it: when installing a new app, most people just aren’t reading deep into the permissions list.
Another smart feature of the app is the ability to control which of the modules you use. You can toggle all four of the main features on or off, which is great for users who prefer to use alternate backup options, for example.
Like many other apps that rely on a free and clear signal to function properly, Lookout’s backup and locator features can fail when signal-throttling apps, such as JuiceDefender, interfere with Lookout. What’s sorely missed here is a notification, either by e-mail or natively on the phone, that warns you that there’s been a failure to communicate.
There are some key features that Lookout only makes available in its premium upgrade, which costs $2.99 per month or $29.99 for a one-year license. The Privacy adviser, photo backup, call backup, data transfer to a new phone, remote wipe, remote lock, and premium support are all restricted to the premium upgrade.
Performance
As noted earlier, Lookout’s performance is hard to gauge on a purely antivirus-based scale. What we did look at is how the phone start-up times are affected by the app. When looking at “cold booting” the phone, in which the phone is completely shut off, started, and then timed until the 3G connection has been established, the Droid 2 we tested without Lookout averaged 58.46 seconds to boot over three attempts. With Lookout installed, the phone averaged 1 minute, 9.83 seconds to boot over three attempts. It would definitely be an improvement if the app caused less of an impact on a phone’s start-up time, as an addition of nearly 10 seconds can feel much longer on a phone.
When tested on a different handset following the same procedure, Lookout’s performance was much improved. When tested on a LG Optimus U running Android 2.2, the phone took an average of 51.12 seconds to start up over three cold boots when Lookout was running. Without Lookout, the phone started in an average of 48.31 seconds. An impact of about two and a half seconds on startup time is completely respectable, and indicates a minimal impact on the phone. It also highlights how different hardware, different app installations, and different cellular networks can affect a phone’s boot time.
Once logged in to MyLookout.com, you can track your phone if it’s on, as well as remotely lock it, wipe it, or have it emit a piercing siren designed to annoy the thief and alert others.
Lookout will also add a couple seconds to the installation of any app, as it scans newly installed apps to ensure that they’re safe. Depending on which apps are running in the background, this can be inconsequential or feel like tedium in a handset. It’s an essential part of Lookout’s protective behaviors, although that doesn’t mean we wouldn’t like to see it shortened.
Overall, Lookout’s performance impact on Android’s speed is the app’s weak point. It will improve as hardware improves, although for now it seems to be a necessary evil for the app’s features.
Conclusion
Lookout adds a necessary security net to your Android phone. Even if you disable the antivirus protection, its other features make it more than worthwhile by providing essential features not otherwise available in one package. Either the free version or the premium upgrade is worth having, since both contribute significantly to keeping your phone and your data on it safe.

<strong>License: </strong>Free

<strong>Limitations: </strong>No limitations

<a href=”https://market.android.com/details?id=com.lookout” target=”_blank”>Download Now
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